Angebote zu "William" (7 Treffer)

An Apologetical Dedication To The Reverend Dr. ...
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An Apologetical Dedication To The Reverend Dr. Henry Stebbing:In Answer To His Censure And Misrepresentations Of The Sermon Preached On The General Fast Day December 18, 1745 (1746) William Warburton

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 06.12.2017
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A Bride for William: Sun River Brides, Book 7 ,...
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Madelaine Crane has led a life of privilege, but her comfortable life has been ripped apart by scandal. Can she overcome the gossip and forge her way to a life of fulfilment and love despite their censure? Doctor William Havering is busy. His practice in Sun River means he spends all his time caring for everyone but himself, but he wants so much more. Has he bitten off more than he can chew with feisty and forthright Madelaine? Will he understand and forgive? 1. Language: English. Narrator: Alan Taylor. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/071907de/bk_rhde_002536_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible - Hörbücher
Stand: 22.11.2017
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Aids to Truth and Charity als Buch von Thomas J...
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Aids to Truth and Charity:A Letter Addressed to William Fitzgerald, D. D. , Bishop of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross, Being a Vindication of John and Charles Wesley, George Whitefield, and Their People, Against His Censures Contained in a Volume Entitled Aids t Thomas Jackson

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 06.12.2017
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Aids to Truth and Charity als Buch von Thomas J...
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Aids to Truth and Charity ab 29.99 EURO A Letter Addressed to William Fitzgerald, D. D. , Bishop of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross, Being a Vindication of John and Charles Wesley, George Whitefield, and Their People, Against His Censures Contained in a Volume Entitled Aids t

Anbieter: eBook.de
Stand: 30.11.2017
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The English Poets, Vol. 2
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Excerpt from The English Poets, Vol. 2: Selections With Critical Introductions Song (from Epicaene) Charis´ Triumph (from Underwoods) Truth (from Hymenaei) The Shepherds´ Holiday (from Pan´ 5 Anniversary) Song before the Entry cf the Masquers (from The Fortunate Isles) Lde to Himself (after the failure of The New Inn) Song. - To Celia (from The Forest) Epigrams To my mere English Censurer On court-worm To Fool or Knave On Lucy, Countess of Bedford Epitaph on Salathiel Pavy Epitaph on Elizabeth L. H. An Ode to Himself (from Underwoods) To the Memory of my Beloved Master William Shakespeare (from the First Folio). Epitaph on the Countess of Pembroke (from Underwoods) Epitaph on Master Philip Gray (from Underwoods) Epode (from The Forest) To Heaven (from The Forest) About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Anbieter: buecher.de
Stand: 07.12.2017
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English History Made Brief, Irreverent, and Ple...
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Here at last is a history of England that is designed to entertain as well as inform and that will delight the armchair traveler, the tourist, or just about anyone interested in history. No people have engendered quite so much acclaim or earned so much censure as the English: extolled as the Athenians of modern times, yet hammered for their self-satisfaction and hypocrisy. But their history has been a spectacular one. The guiding principle of this book´s heretical approach is that ´´history is not everything that happened but what is worth remembering about the past´´. Thus its chapters deal mainly with ´´Memorable History´´ in blocks of time over the centuries. The final chapter, ´´The Royal Soap Opera´´, recounts the achievements, personalities, and idiocies of the royal family since the arrival of William the Conqueror in 1066. Spiced with dozens of hilarious cartoons from Punch and other publications, English History will be a welcome and amusing tour of a land that has always fascinated Anglophiles and Anglophobes alike. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Peter Noble. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/adbl/029429de/bk_rhde_002536_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible - Hörbücher
Stand: 22.11.2017
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Utopia
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Mores Utopia was written in Latin, and is in two parts, of which the second, describing the place ([Greek text]-or Nusquama, as he called it sometimes in his letters-Nowhere), was probably written towards the close of 1515; the first part, introductory, early in 1516. The book was first printed at Louvain, late in 1516, under the editorship of Erasmus, Peter Giles, and other of Mores friends in Flanders. It was then revised by More, and printed by Frobenius at Basle in November, 1518. It was reprinted at Paris and Vienna, but was not printed in England during Mores lifetime. Its first publication in this country was in the English translation, made in Edwards VI.s reign (1551) by Ralph Robinson. It was translated with more literary skill by Gilbert Burnet, in 1684, soon after he had conducted the defence of his friend Lord William Russell, attended his execution, vindicated his memory, and been spitefully deprived by James II. of his lectureship at St. Clements. Burnet was drawn to the translation of Utopia by the same sense of unreason in high places that caused More to write the book. Burnets is the translation given in this volume. The name of the book has given an adjective to our language-we call an impracticable scheme Utopian. Yet, under the veil of a playful fiction, the talk is intensely earnest, and abounds in practical suggestion. It is the work of a scholarly and witty Englishman, who attacks in his own way the chief political and social evils of his time. Beginning with fact, More tells how he was sent into Flanders with Cuthbert Tunstal, whom the kings majesty of late, to the great rejoicing of all men, did prefer to the office of Master of the Rolls; how the commissioners of Charles met them at Bruges, and presently returned to Brussels for instructions; and how More then went to Antwerp, where he found a pleasure in the society of Peter Giles which soothed his desire to see again his wife and children, from whom he had been four months away. Then fact slides into fiction with the finding of Raphael Hythloday (whose name, made of two Greek words [Greek text] and [Greek text], means knowing in trifles), a man who had been with Amerigo Vespucci in the three last of the voyages to the new world lately discovered, of which the account had been first printed in 1507, only nine years before Utopia was written. Designedly fantastic in suggestion of details, Utopia is the work of a scholar who had read Platos Republic, and had his fancy quickened after reading Plutarchs account of Spartan life under Lycurgus. Beneath the veil of an ideal communism, into which there has been worked some witty extravagance, there lies a noble English argument. Sometimes More puts the case as of France when he means England. Sometimes there is ironical praise of the good faith of Christian kings, saving the book from censure as a political attack on the policy of Henry VIII. Erasmus wrote to a friend in 1517 that he should send for Mores Utopia, if he had not read it, and wished to see the true source of all political evils. And to More Erasmus wrote of his book, A burgomaster of Antwerp is so pleased with it that he knows it all by heart. Sir Thomas More, son of Sir John More, a justice of the Kings Bench, was born in 1478, in Milk Street, in the city of London. After his earlier education at St. Anthonys School, in Threadneedle Street, he was placed, as a boy, in the household of Cardinal John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Chancellor. It was not unusual for persons of wealth or influence and sons of good families to be so established together in a relation of patron and client. The youth wore his patrons livery, and added to his state. The patron used, afterwards, his wealth or influence in helping his young client forward in the world.

Anbieter: ciando eBooks
Stand: 07.11.2017
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